Beverage Industry Responds to CSPI Petition to Limit Added Sugars
February 14, 2013 - News
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WASHINGTON—The American Beverage Association (ABA) issued a statement in response to a petition sent to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) by the Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI) and other health advocates asking the agency to determine a safe level of added sugars for beverages regarding caloric sweeteners in beverages.

According to the ABA statement: “Everyone has a role to play in reducing obesity levels—a fact completely ignored in this petition. This is why the beverage industry has worked to increase options and information for consumers.

  • Today, about 45% of all non-alcoholic beverages purchased have zero calories, and the overall average number of calories per beverage serving is down 2% since 1998.
  • Beverage companies voluntarily removed full-calorie soft drinks from all schools and replaced them with lower-calorie choices, resulting in a 90% reduction in beverage calories shipped to schools since 2004.
  • Beverage companies voluntarily added calorie labels to the front of all their packages, making it easier than ever for consumers to know how many calories are in their beverage choice before making a purchase.
  • Americans are consuming 37% fewer calories from sugar in soft drinks and other sweetened beverages than in 2000, according to the CDC.

We look forward to working with all interested parties in making further strides in bringing down obesity levels and helping consumers make informed decisions for themselves and their families."

 

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