Arsenic Contamination in Food, Water
April 10, 2013 - News
Comments

NEW ORLEANS—Arsenic occurs naturally in elevated concentrations in the soil in certain areas of the world and sometimes leaches into drinking water supplies and food. Arsenic has made headlines over the past few years after reports of its presence in apple juice and rice, as well as groundwater in Bangladesh and Chile, as was the subject of a recent symposium held during the 245th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

The goal of the “Arsenic Contamination in Food and Water" symposium was to bring together experts on many aspects of arsenic, including general insights about arsenic contamination in food and water, regulatory issues, ways to analyze the element and ways to clean up contamination.

Topics included “Poisoner's cupboard: The long (and sometimes homicidal) history of arsenic in everyday life"; “Arsenic in rice and rice products"; “Remediation of arsenic contamination of groundwater in Asia and USA"; “Development of a method for assessing perinatal exposures to heavy metals using residual dried blood spots from newborn screening programs"; “Pick your poison? Arsenic in harvested country foods, edible mushrooms and wine from Canada" and “Low, slow and Next Gen impact: Arsenic, human health and cancer risks."

Sources:

Comments
comments powered by Disqus
Related News
News
The United Nation's Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) is mobilizing support to the
News
The possibility of increasing healthful pterostilbene in crops, such as grapes and berries, may be
News
The EU-funded ABSTRESS project will address the issue of crop failure due to climate change by
News
To bolster and help harness Indiana’s $16 billion food and agricultural industry, as well as
News
Researchers at the University of Kent and East Malling Research have identified a new way of